My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Twelve, Unforeseen Hope Review: A Dark Future.

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For an episode titled “Unforeseen Hope”, My Hero Academia’s twelfth episode of the fourth season is almost anything but hopeful.
The heroes just seem to get kicked down every time they get up this episode, with Overhaul utilizing his quirk in the most unique and disturbing of ways.
He actually destroys his and Nemoto’s bodies and then fuses them together to create an even more powerful form.
This goes to show not only how powerful Overhaul is but also how cruel he is, especially in comparison to the League of Villains.
Despite not being good people, the League actually do care about one another.
Overhaul, on the other hand, appears to not be capable of empathy at all, throwing his allies away like pawns and using them for his own gain.
This is taken even further with his treatment of Eri, as a flashback shows he cruelly dissembled and reassembled her every time her body got too tired to handle the experimentation.
Honestly, Overhaul is giving All For One a run for his money in terms of evilness.
Still, you cannot deny his intelligence in using his quirk the way he did, which even allows him to defeat Nighteye’s foresight, mortally wounding him.
Nighteye, a character who can literally see into the future, being defeated by Overhaul shows how much of a threat he is.
Not only this, but Nighteye’s foresight also predicts a dark future, as the hero says he saw that Overhaul would kill him and Deku before escaping with Eri.
Along with this, we also got more of an insight into Nighteye’s reasoning for not using his quirk, as he believes that by using it on All Might he has condemned his friend to a horrible death.
However, despite all this misery, I do suppose the episode title is right in one way as Deku promises to change the future and save Eri.
It will be hard for him to do so, though, because he will have to contend both with Overhaul’s over powered strength and his emotional manipulation of Eri, as shown when he uses Nemoto’s quirk to guilt trip her into coming back to him.
Poor Eri.
I just want to wrap her up in Lemillion’s cape and never let her go (epic foreshadowing).
In any case, alongside the great fight with Overhaul, we also got more insight into Rock Lock and the League.
Rock Lock’s development shows us why he was so tough on Deku and Mirio because he has a kid of his own and was just looking out for them.
As for the League, it appears they have made a new plan to make Overhaul “cry like a baby”, as Toga put it; something I will be very interested to see.
The episode ends with the party literally being crashed as Ryuko, Ochako, Tsuyu, and Nejire smash through the ceiling using the Eight Bullets member Rikiya Katsukame.
Overall, “Unforeseen Hope ” is another great episode of My Hero Academia.
My only big criticism is that I feel some of the shots of Overhaul’s new form look a bit off animation wise because of how static he is, which really drew me out of the action and drama.
Other than this, though, “Unforeseen Hope” is a crazy episode that is sure to lead to an even crazier one.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode 11, Lemillion Review: A Hero’s Sacrifice.

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For a long time, the tenth episode of season two, “Shoto Todoroki: Origin” was my favourite episode of My Hero Academia. 
Well, I can easily say that the episode just got beaten by the eleventh of season four, “Lemillion”, which features the heroic sacrifice of Mirio Togata.
Not of his life but his quirk.
The build up to this moment is excellent, with the opening of Overhaul revealing the bullets that can remove a quirk forever serving as sinister foreshadowing for what is to come.
Before this tragic moment occurs, though, the episode picks up from where “Temp Squad” left off with Mimic attempting to crush both the heroes and the League of Villains.
However, this does not go well for him because Deku manages to expose his hiding place, giving Aizawa enough time to disable his quirk and take him off the playing field.
With Mimic out of the picture, the episode then cuts to Mirio catching up to Overhaul and his right hand man Chronostasis, who have Eri.
However, before he can do anything, he is attacked by the two remaining members of the Eight Bullets of the Hassaikai, Shin Nemoto and Deidoro Sakai, who both have pretty tough quirks to get through.
Nemoto’s is confession, which allows him to make any person answer his questions truthfully; a quirk that he uses pretty humorously on Twice and Toga in a flashback.
As for Sakai, his quirk is Slosh, which means he can transfer his drunkenness to other people.
For the brief time the two minions of Overhaul are on screen they have a pretty comedic dynamic, with one gag of Sakai throwing a bottle at Nemoto leaving me in fits of laughter.
The laughter fades quickly, however, as Mirio fights past them and reaches Overhaul, ripping Eri from Chronostasis’ arms and declaring to Eri that he will be her hero.
This leads to Overhaul chastising Eri, cruelly calling her cursed.
Mirio is outraged that he would say that to his own daughter, leading to one of the most chilling moments in the episode where Overhaul removes his glove, coldly reveals that he has no children, and then immediately going on the attack.
On a side note, while I do believe the sub of My Hero Academia is better than the dub, the English voice actor of Overhaul, Kellen Goff, does a great job here, especially with the chuckle of amusement he adds to his voice.
The following fight between Mirio and Overhaul is fantastic, with both of their quirks being brilliantly used.
From Overhaul deconstructing the ground and then reconstructing it as deadly spikes, to Mirio using his permeation to pass through Eri to kick Chronostasis and then shield Eri with his cape only to ambush the two.
Mirio would have beaten Overhaul had it not been for Nemoto who, through his blind devotion to Overhaul, managed to crawl to the battlefield.
Receiving a quirk removing bullet from the young head, Nemoto realizes the only way he will be able to hit Mirio is to trick him into shielding Eri.
And so Mirio’s sacrifice commences, with him taking the bullet for Eri with a smile on his face, comforting her.
We then get a flashback to Mirio’s journey to becoming a hero and Overhaul’s gleeful cry (completely ignoring Nemoto’s pleas for recognition) makes us think that Mirio’s dream is over.
Until this perception is completely shattered as Mirio keeps fighting, despite losing his quirk, and manages to hold Overhaul off and protect Eri until help arrives.
As Mirio says, no matter what he’s still Lemillion.
This is by far the most inspirational scene of My Hero Academia with everything coming together from the voice acting, to the animation, to the music, it’s all fantastic.
The episode really shows why I placed Mirio at number eight on my top 10 My Hero Academia characters list.
“Lemillion” is, without a doubt, my favourite episode of the entire series so far.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Ten, Temp Squad Review: One, Big, Unhappy Villain Family.

4 stars
One of the reasons I like the League of Villains from My Hero Academia so much is because of how much they feel like an actual dysfunctional family.
Well, the tenth episode of the fourth season, “Temp Squad”, adapts the first time I actually began to see the villains this way perfectly, with the character growth of Twice, Toga and Shigaraki.
In a flashback, we are gifted with the sight of Twice struggling with his guilt over Big Sis Magne’s death in a great character moment for him.
“I may be a villain but I’m still human. We all are, man”, Twice states in a heartbreaking moment after Shigaraki announces he wants Twice and Toga to go work for Overhaul.
As for Toga, her reaction to Shigaraki’s order is much colder, as she threatens him with a knife.
Her family-like moment comes when she covers Twice’s mask up with a cloth to keep his personalities from splitting.
Back to the flashback scene, Shigaraki shocks both her and Twice by removing the hand from his face, for what I think is the first time in front of them, and tells them this is for all of them because he wants the two to infiltrate Overhaul’s group and gain their trust.
He goes on to say that he will trust them to know what to do.
This is the moment Shigaraki’s growth from the man child to the confident leader was cemented for me when I read the manga and it is wonderfully adapted here.
Just as wonderful is the visual of Toga and Twice spinning in the air before dancing over their trust in Shigaraki and being able to do what they want.
This leads to them insulting Mimic in an impromptu moment that leads to the cliffhanger of him trying to crush both them and the heroes.
However, not every moment with Twice and Toga is all family-like because they cause plenty of mayhem.
This mainly applies to Toga, who manages to successfully stab Rock Lock thanks to a diversion from one of Twice’s clones.
Taking on Rock Lock’s appearance, Toga attacks Deku and would have cut him for sure if Aizawa had not been there.
As for Twice, he was much less successful, with his clone of Rappa being easily defeated by Nighteye with the help of his support items.
Nighteye then attacks him, leading to the moment where Twice almost splits but Toga arrives to help him.
So, all in all, this in an almost entirely villain centric episode.
The plot may have not progressed that much overall but the character growth for the villains Twice, Toga and Shigaraki is fantastic.
Another solid episode.
I am incredibly excited for the next episode, though, because it will give Mirio his chance to shine.
The previous episode showed why I love Kirishima so much as a character and the next episode will do the same for Mirio.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Nine, Red Riot Review: A Spear and a Shield vs a Shield and a Shield.

5 stars
I have been anticipating the ninth episode of My Hero Academia’s fourth season “Red Riot” for a while because it was this moment in the manga that propelled Kirishima to one of my favourite characters.
Thankfully, the episode did not disappoint, adapting both Kirishima’s backstory and his and Fat Gum’s fight with Kendo Rappa and Hekiji Tengai perfectly.
“Red Riot” picks up from Tamaki’s battle with three of the eight bullets of the Hissaikai and sees Mimic send Fat Gum and Kirishima into a dark room where they are meet by Rappa and Tengai for a battle of spear and shield vs shield and shield.
In this case, Rappa and Tengai make for the perfect combination, with Rappa dealing out devastating blows as the spear and Tengai providing an almost impenetrable shield for them.
As for Kirishima and Fat Gum, their status as shields puts them at an instant disadvantage from Rappa’s punches, especially Kirishima who is hit so hard that his hardening starts to come undone.
Que, emotional backstory to inspire him to save the day.
In all seriousness, Kirishima’s backstory is one of the best in the series so far.
Kirishima always tried to help people but he lacked something to dive in head first.
In comparison, fellow student Mina Ashido had all the qualities of a hero in the making, protecting her friends from a gigantic villain (who will be important later) by giving him the wrong directions to a hero agency.
Kirishima witnesses this but is unable to act and this causes a massive blow to his confidence.
It is then that, as if by fate, he happens to see an interview from his favourite hero, Crimson Riot, who tells the story of how someone died because he did not act and now his biggest fear is being unable to act, which drives him forward.
Inspired by this, Kirishima set out to completely remake himself into a chivalrous hero, apologizing to the girls he did not help, (even though they have no idea who he is but that is not important) and even dyes his hair red, prompting playful teasing from Mina.
The scene between the two is very sweet and is what made me start to ship them when I read the manga.
Back to the situation at hand, upon remembering why he set out to become a chivalrous hero in the first place, Kirishima leaps in front of Fat Gum to protect him with a burst of inspirational music.
This allows Fat Gum enough time to transfer his quirk from a shield to a spear as he stores the power of the blows Rappa is unloading on him into pure energy, which he releases, along with all of his fat.
It is here that we get our first look at him without this fat and I am sure a number of Squidward “oh no! He’s hot!” memes will be generated from this.
In any case, it is with this release of energy that Fat Gum defeats Rappa and Tengai with the help of Kirishima.
Kirishima’s growth during this episode is fantastic, with his self doubt transitioning perfectly into his backstory, which then leads to his heroic return to the fight at the end of the episode.
Likewise, Fat Gum also gets his moment with the reveal of his spear attack.
It is not just Kirishima and Fat Gum that shines in “Red Riot”, though, as Rappa instantly stands out as the only member of eight bullets who does not follow Overhaul blindly.
The reasons for this will most likely be unveiled in the next episode and make him the most interesting member of the Hissaikai, with the exception of Overhaul himself.
Overall, “Red Riot” is the best episode of My Hero Academia‘s fourth season so far with Kirishima’s character arc being particularly exceptional.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Eight, Suneater of the Big Three Review: The Parallel of Hero and Villains.

4 and a half stars
After episode seven of My Hero Academia‘s fourth season “GO!” promised a followup, action filled episode with its cliffhanger, that episode “Suneater of the Big Three” delivers on this.
As the title suggests, the main character of this episode is Tamaki Amajiki, AKA Suneater, who goes on an emotional journey in his fight this episode, with plenty of parallels between him and the villains he fights.
These three villains are members of the eight expendable bullets, Toya Setsuno, Yu Hojo, and Soramitsu Tabe.
Thrown out and left for dead by society, these three were eventually taken in and brainwashed by Overhaul to fight for him to the bitter end.
“Even trash has its pride,” Yu states at one point, showing the extent that they have been influenced by their boss.
And, just as these villains are influenced by Overhaul, Tamaki is influenced by Mirio in a clear parallel.
As a child Tamaki had no self confidence until Mirio came along and inspired him to believe in himself, just like the villains were lifted out of their situation by Overhaul’s brainwashing.
This presents a two sides of the same coin parallel, where Tamaki has been correctly influenced and the villains negatively, leading to to conflict.
Tamaki’s battle with the villains is absolutely fantastic with both sides utilizing their quirks with ingenious tactics.
Toya and Yu make a great combination, until Tamaki uses his Chimera Kraken technique, forcing them to call in Tabe to even the odds again, only for Tamaki to outwit them and finally take them down.
The constant back and forth on who was winning this fight made for an intense battle where the viewer would have been unsure of who would win right to the very end.
As for other moments in the episode, they are also very well done, with another great display of Sir Nighteye’s quirk and plenty of heart warming flashbacks to Tamaki’s friendship with Mirio.
All in all, “Suneater of the Big Three” is the best episode of season four so far.
However, it will almost certainly be overtaken next episode, which will see an even more intense fight with Kirishima, along with revealing his backstory, which I am very excited to see animated.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Seven, GO! Review: It Gets Noisy.

3 and a half stars
The fight to rescue Eri officially began in the seventh episode of season four, the appropriately titled “GO!”
On par with the previous episode, “GO!” serves as good buildup for the fights that we will be seeing in subsequent episodes.
Picking up in the aftermath of Nighteye revealing the dark truth of what is happening to Eri, Deku and the other students are on standby while the pro-heroes try to find her locations.
It is during this time that we get both a lot of funny and emotional moments as the characters prepare themselves.
Deku and Mirio remain constantly intense and focused due to their desire to rescue Eri as seen by a touching scene where Iida and Todoroki attempt to share Deku up.
As for the other characters, they are a lot more comedic.
There is the funny moment when Bakugo demands to know what they have learned only for Kirishima to shout out that they can’t tell.
The funniest, and probably most adorable moment, though, comes after a text is sent out confirming Eri’s location has been found.
As Mirio meets outside with Nejire and Tamaki, Nejire has her implausibly long hair tied around her like a scarf in a humorously adorable moment that I am pretty sure is anime only.
However, “GO!” is not all fun and games as proven from the moment Nighteye discovers where Eri is.
This scene provides a flashback that perfectly shows Nighteye’s quirk in usage, much like a film projector, before the pro-heroes and students go to rescue the girl.
Unfortunately, Overhaul knows they are coming and goes to see the comatose boss of the Yakuza, apologizing to him because, “things are about to get noisy.”
And noisy they get because as soon as the police ring the doorbell one of the eight expendable bullets of the Shie Hissaikai bursts through the door, ready to fight.
This leads to a great display of many characters’ quirks, especially Ryukyu who turns into a dragon.
Another instance of a new quirk usage comes with Rock Lock who can freeze moving objects in place, which he uses to cross buildings.
Back to the action at hand, the characters rush towards the building to find Eri as the episode ends with Deku and Mirio thinking for the hundredth time that they will definitely, definitely, definitely, definitely, definitively save her.
That’s a lot of definitelys.
In any case, while the amount of time the two characters say this over the course of the episode does get repetitive, you can still clearly see their dedication to making up for not rescuing the girl earlier.
I would say that “GO!” is probably as good as the previous episode of My Hero Academia.
All of its buildup will finally payoff next episode with the eight expendable bullets coming into play, leading to standout moments from both Tamaki and Kirishima in future episodes.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Six, An Unpleasant Talk Review: The Dark Truth.

3 and a half stars
The sixth episode of My Hero Academia‘s fourth season, “An Unpleasant Talk” sees the beginning of the formation of the plan to take down Overhaul, along with the reveal of the dark truth behind Eri.
It is a exposition heavy episode, which may not please some, but is necessary to pushing the story forward and also gives us insight into many of the characters, specifically Deku, Mirio, Nighteye and Overhaul.
Starting with the villain of this arc, the reveal of Overhaul’s cruel nature is adapted perfectly with the great image of him symbolically looming above a captured Eri, with the viles containing her blood floating around them.
This symbolic image is undoubtedly one of the series’ darkest visuals with its reveal that Overhaul is experimenting on Eri to create a drug that will remove people’s quirks.
Along with this, it really goes to show how cruel and uncaring of a person Overhaul is, as he is willing to hurt anyone, even children, if it furthers his goals.
The affect this has on Deku and Mirio is immediate as they are both instantly full of guilt upon realizing what is happening to Eri because they failed to rescue her.
The weight of the guilt they now have on their shoulders will now drive their story throughout this arc, as proven by Deku being so distracted that he cannot continue his school work properly.
Along with him and Mirio, Nighteye also has a heavy burden, refusing to use his foresight on any of the task force members he has assembled to take down Overhaul and rescue Eri.
The reasons for this are clear, based off episode four’s flashback to his fight with All Might.
Nighteye predicted his eventual gruesome death and he does not want to risk predicting any similar fate for his fellow heroes.
However, such a fate will need to be risked by these heroes if they want to save Eri.
Her situation is made abundantly clear in the post-credits scene with one of Overhaul’s minions trying to win her trust with gifts and fake affection.
However, Eri can only think of Deku, having never experienced the kind of warm embrace that he gave her.
Thankfully, the rest of the episode is not as depressing as this because there are some light hearted moments towards the beginning.
Moments such as Tsuyu and Ochako saying how cute Fat Gum is, only for him to offer them candy, brought a smile to my face.
One bit that also made me laugh was the Beatles reference where Deku, Ochako, Tsuyu, and Kirishima are shown walking across the street just like the band did on Abbey Road.
I wonder what brought on that reference?
In any case, “An Unpleasant Talk” is a solid episode of My Hero Academia that, while mostly exposition, sets up the goals and fears of its characters very well.

My Hero Academia Season Four Episode Five, Let’s Go, Gutsy Red Riot Review: Rise of Kirishima.

4 and a half stars
I said in my Top 10 My Hero Academia Characters post that Kirishima became one of my favourite characters because of the Overhaul arc and the fifth episode of season four “Let’s Go, Gutsy Red Riot” is the start of that.
This really was Kirishima’s episode, building up his development for this arc nicely with a great starting point as we see him begin his work study with the hero Fat Gum and Tamaki.
Speaking of these two, they are also two characters who I am excited to see more of as they grow as characters and use their quirks.
Fat Gum’s quirk is absorption, which allows him to entrap enemies, and Tamaki’s quirk is manifest, which allows him to take on the qualities of whatever he eats.
It is Kirishima’s quirk that takes center stage this episode though, with him developing a new technique Unbreakable to fight a minor villain (which may be a reference to the M. Night Shyamalan film, or maybe I’m reaching).
This villain takes quirk enhancing drugs, forcing Kirishima to use his new move to protect civilians in an epic moment that was perfectly adapted from the manga.
The music and animation here are stellar and the only problem is that it is a bit distracting at how stupid the civilians are by not getting out of the way.
Although, this does not take away from Kirishima’s achievements, thankfully, with him beginning his development for the season upon remembering some advice from Bakugo.
This also goes to show just how much Bakugo has changed because he most likely would have yelled at Kirishima when they first met rather than give his friend the advise he needed.
Back to Kirishima, after Fat Gum manages to successfully capture the villain we get brief flashes to Kirishima’s backstory, which will play out in a future episode.
I also like how vague these flashes are because they will probably leave many anime only viewers wondering what they are seeing until it is officially revealed.
Along with Kirishima’s development, we also get our first look at the quirk removing bullets developed by Overhaul, which the minor villain uses to temporarily remove Tamaki’s quirk.
This bullet is revealed by Shigaraki in his meeting with Overhaul, which leads to Shigaraki agreeing to a form of partnership, though under very tense circumstances.
Less tense is the opening fight sequence where we see Ochako and Tsuyu on their work study with Nejire and the pro hero Ryukyo.
Their scene was mainly used to show what the two Class 1A students are doing and to  highlight Nejire’s quirk but it has fantastic animation in the opening fight.
It is also here that a meeting between many pro heroes led by Sir Nighteye is first brought up.
This meeting to discuss the threat Overhaul poses will appear next episode and fully unveil the disturbing truth about his quirk removing bullets.
Overall, “Let’s Go, Gutsy Red Riot” is another solid episode of My Hero Academia with a great starting point for Kirishima’s character arc.

My Hero Academia Season Four, Episode Four, Fighting Fate Review: Can Fate be Averted?

4 and a half stars
After the anticipated arrival of the adorable Eri last episode, the fourth episode of My Hero Academia‘s fourth season “Fighting Fate” picks up with the rest of her first encounter with Deku and Mirio.
Unfortunately, this is also Deku and Mirio’s first encounter with the villain Overhaul as well.
What follows is an intense scene where Deku tries to protect Eri while maintaining the facade that he does not know who Overhaul is.
Ultimately, though, Deku’s instincts as a hero overrule this second priority when Eri begins to beg Deku not to leave her.

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With Eri’s introduction, the emotional core of the season arrives.

It is in this scene where we get to see both Deku and Mirio’s skills as future heroes because while Deku is protective, Mirio is quick thinking, dodging Overhaul’s prying questions expertly.
However, both their combined efforts are not enough to save Eri as the two are incredibly out of their depth, which Eri clearly notices because she goes back to Overhaul when he makes a subtle threat to kill Deku and Mirio.
Her doing so gives us a really good sense of her character as, despite the pain she has endured at Overhaul’s hands, she is willing to go back with him so he won’t hurt anyone.
The consequences for her are clearly laid out as Overhaul brings her into an experimental room announcing her to be the “crux” of his plan.
This is where one of my very few problems with the episode comes in because, compared to the manga, shots like that of the room Overhaul brings Eri into are not as detailed, lessening their impact.

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This detailed room that makes the horror Eri is experiencing very clear in the manga is sadly reduced in the anime.

Another thing from the manga that I was disappointed to see left out of the anime was Sir Nighteye’s reaction to hearing Deku wish he could have protected Eri.
In the manga we get a panel of him looking remorseful with his back to Deku, showing he does care, despite wishing Deku had not been chosen to receive One For All.
Sadly, this effective shot is nowhere to be seen in the episode.
Thankfully, what is not removed is Overhaul’s cruelty because he murders the subordinate who was supposed to be watching Eri when she escaped.
Overhaul then makes a comment about people being sick with “hero syndrome,” foreshadowing the future reveal of his motives.
Following these dark scenes, we get the emotional highlight of “Fighting Fate,” which is Deku’s confrontation with All Might.
Deku wants to know why All Might never told him about Mirio being the original candidate for One For All but instead learns a darker truth.
This truth is that when All Might and Sir Nighteye separated because All Might refused to retire after his injury, Nighteye used his foresight to predict that All Might will die a gruesome death in the near future.
The music and voice acting during this scene are top notch with Night Eye’s voice actor Shin-ichiro Miki doing a great job.

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Nighteye’s prediction is the most emotional moment of the episode with a dark fate for All Might being set up.

The following moment with All Might and Deku after this moment are also fantastic with the best animation of the season so far giving the emotion of the scene a bigger punch.
In the end, Deku begs All Might to live long enough to see him tell the world that he is here and All Might swears to fight the fate he has been given.
And then, of course, the episode ends with a comedic moment, as All Might is once again too scared to reconcile with Night Eye.
“Fighting Fate” is another great episode of My Hero Academia that is probably tied with “Overhaul” as my favourite episode of the fourth season so far.
And now, with Eri, the emotional centerpiece of the season, introduced, the story will begin to pick up even more.

My Hero Academia, Season Four, Episode Three, Boy Meets… Review: The Two Meetings.

3 and a half stars
“Boy Meets…” is the perfect title for My Hero Academia season four’s third episode because it is all about Deku meeting and interacting with multiple characters for the first time.
Sir Nighteye is the the most obvious meeting, with more than half the episode focusing on him and Deku’s interactions.
Their conversation and later game did a great job of emphasizing the parallels between them, with multiple similarities and differences.
Despite Nighteye not liking Deku because of how he views him as usurping Miro’s chance of inheriting One For All, they are still similar with the both of them being massive All Might fans with their own ways of showing that.
Nighteye looks past these similarities, though, still not believing Deku to be worthy of One For All and tests him by having Deku try to defeat his quirk foresight, which allows him to accurately predict his decisions for an hour.
Deku both fails and succeeds in the test, failing to grab the stamp Nighteye is holding but succeeding in making sure he does not damage all of Nighteye’s All Might merchandise.
This shows that Deku is able to multitask in his fighting, proving himself to Nighteye, even if he was planning to accept him no matter what.
However, Nighteye’s intentions in accepting Deku are not entirely pure because he hopes to convince him to give up One For All to Mirio.
This meeting sets up both Deku and Nighteye very well for their arcs in this storyline.
What is by far the most exciting scene, though, is Deku’s second meeting of the episode with Eri and Overhaul in the after credits scene.
I am overjoyed to see Eri make her appearance in the series because she is one of my favourite characters and the centerpiece of the season.
Deku’s meeting with her and Overhaul also gets the ball rolling for the big story of the arc so I cannot wait to see this first meeting truly play out next episode.
Aside from these two well done first meetings, the rest of “Boy Meets…” is more decent setup that is actually anime original.
The scene of Aizawa informing Uraraka and Tsuyu that Nejire wants to talk to them, and telling Kirishima that Amajiki wants to meet with him, is probably added to provide a starting point for where we will see these characters in subsequent episodes.
Most interesting, though, is the moment Aizawa tells Tokoyami that the Number Three Pro Hero, Hawks, has offered him an internship.
For those of you expecting to see the two working together, I would not get your hopes up.
This is because Hawks does not have a role in the arcs season four will be covering and will not get a big part in the story until the fifth season.
As a result, this mention of Hawks is most likely just fan service to hype up his future appearance.
Although, who knows?
Maybe we could get an anime only scene of Hawks and Tokoyami’s internship this season.
That would be interesting.
Overall, “Boy Meets…” is a good setup episode for My Hero Academia that both builds up Nighteye’s character arc and gets the ball rolling with Overhaul and Eri’s role in the story through them meeting Deku.
It will be great to see the first interaction Deku and Mirio have with Overhaul and Eri in the next episode.